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News: 11 Million Americans Identify As LGBTQ

Image credit: patrickblackjr on Pixabay

If you ever feel like you’re alone as an LGBTQ individual, know that that probably isn’t true — there are millions of us out there/ According to the Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law, there are around 11.3 million adults in the United States who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. That translates to about 4.5 percent of U.S. adults.

Broken down, 58 percent if that 11.3 million are females while the remaining 42 percent are males. Whites make up 58 percent of the population, while Latino/as and African-Americans  make up 21 percent and 12 percent respectively. The LGBTQ population also tends to skew younger, with an average age of 37.3. The average age of non-LGBTQ individuals is 47.9.

When it comes to the size of their LGBTQ population, Washington D.C., Oregon, Nevada Massachusetts, and California have the highest percentage. The states with the lowest percentage are Indiana, Georgia, Delaware, Arizona, and Ohio.

The economic situation of LGBTQ people is a much less rosy situation, according to the study. Compared to non-LGBTQ people, there are more unemployed, uninsured, and food insecure LGBTQ people. Twenty-five percent of the LGBTQ population have an income that is less than $24,000.

This increase in the number of LGBTQ adults in the United States is a continuing trend. In 2016, an estimated 10 million Americans identified as LGBTQ, which at the time was a 1.75 million rise since 2012. As stated in a report posted on the Adam4Adam blog previously, the reason for these increases is because same-sex relations are now more accepted compared to previous generations. Back in 1986, same-sex marriage were supported by less than half of the population, while in 2016, 68 percent of the population were in favor.

What do you guys think of these numbers? Would you agree that there are more LGBTQ people that are unemployed, uninsured, and food insecure? Share your thoughts with us below.


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  1. RL

    Employment issues are driven by many factors, much as minority income has always been stifled, historically. Some of these were dealing with internal conflicts and perhaps performed less well in school. Others, who may have been “out” or “outed”, had to deal with bullying or the more subtle track-blocking.
    I know of a couple of younger people who for orientation-related reasons, started getting their hours cut in fast food places (one of which was BK, which is not known as tolerant). I know of another person who was respected as a professional until coworkers started rumors, and he started getting taken less seriously, criticized at every turn. He finally got fired.
    Even corporate policy cannot overcome subtle undercurrents outside of management sight. Where there is no policy, or where community beliefs are archaic, the LGBTQ person will be held back even more. Aid organizations, often being affiliated with conservative churches , will sometimes decide not to help, on the belief that this “sinner” brought it on himself. This does not include all churches, but just some.
    Social pressures, then, are a major part of the reduced success of this population, in my view.

  2. Lamar

    Ok, interesting, I just wonder are these people “out” at work? How many of these disparages are affecting people or color, or women? What, are their education levels, typically; what are their ages with these very low incomes? I feel like I can somewhat figure-out/imagine some of these scenarios, given these disparages.

    • Dirk

      Christopher-

      327 million in the US includes adults and CHILDREN. Article stipulates that the number applies to adults.

      Read before you react, folks.

  3. bjjj

    That 4.5% are just the individuals that admit being gay or bi. I imagine the percentage is even quite a bit higher. Most all guys (and gals) have at least a bi side. I also agree that if your gay most likely it’s harder to get higher paying jobs, get employed, and be accepted, even by those in the workplaces who know they are bi or gay, as they have to follow the “norm”. accepted way. The only reason that younger people seem to have a higher LGBTQ percentage is that younger people are more open minded, while older people have been indoctrinated into the straight life, not wanting to admit their gay and bi sides. Also most LGBTQ individuals are not out in the open about their sexuality. Myself I don’t broadcast that to others that I am gay, but if asked, or the subject comes up, sure, I’ll admit it to whom ever wants to know.

  4. Libertarian Queer

    Well, yes, I suppose those numbers might be close but I’d have to see more specifics of the study to conclude it is accurate. Do you mean the percentage of unemployed, hungry, and uninsured LGBTQ as compared to the same criteria as measured in the general population? I would think so given my observations of the LGBTQ community. I don’t, however, find it particularly surprising for a number of reasons.

  5. Nathan

    Again, as seemingly, always: the overt discrimination is contingent on the obviousness of the individuals.

    Most Americans will let much ago as long as they do not perceive it as a show of the middle finger. Americans are the most tolerant people on earth…given their diversity and ever-increasing numbers.

    There will be a burial in the next two weeks, of one-of-our-kind, at one-of-the-military academies, and some of us will be attending.

    We will be there and we will pay our respects. Those in attendance will know who we are…just as they knew who were were, ’62 – 66′ and they will greet us warmly because we will all be there for the same purpose..for that individual and collective purpose, exclusive of sexual orientation.

    The “Someday We’ll Be Together” is already here, gentlemen…all we have to do is open our eyes.

    Nathan

  6. Hunter0500

    Agreed. When I thought about how low the figure was it made sense. For many many people, being LGBTQ+ falls ever so far below who they are. One of the last things they’ll do is “Identify” with being LGTBQ+. It’s eversomore so a question of when “my people” get together for a celebration, what’s the cultural color? What’s the music being played? What’s the food being eaten?

    It’s so little about who we’re sexually attracted to.,

  7. Robert Watkins

    For me this whole article reads of stigma of the LGBTQQAAI community within a larger standardized community. Notice how many acronyms have been added to the spectrum of inclusion. It seems that everything evolves in time to something better once accepted by sub-groups, mainstream or the status quo leading to the breaking of the stigma that hinders or drives an issue. Let’s not forget about all those people who transitioned from AIDS in the 80’s & 90″s most of which were classified part of the LGBT population as young Gay men. 658,507 people in the United States with an AIDS diagnosis have died overall and now we have (U=U) Undetectable equals Untransmittable since the advent of antiretroviral became widely available to people living with HIV/AIDS in 1996.

    It’s also studious to observe that since pre and post Equality Laws in the US was passed by the Supreme Court. The Equality Act 2010 has replaced the Equal Pay Act 1970, Sex Discrimination Act 1975, Race Relations Act 1976, Disability Discrimination Act 1995, Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations 2003, Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003 and the Employment Equality (Age) Regulations 2006.

    On June 26, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down all state bans on same-sex marriage, legalized it in all fifty states, and required states to honor out-of-state same-sex marriage licenses in the case Obergefell v. Hodges.

    The question is if we are all a part of these US laws why does stigma and discrimination still exist? It’s all about evolution of the the status quo and popular standards we as a people set for each other. We may have come this far. Look how far we have to go!

  8. Nathan

    We all have fragilities which can limit us or make us more resilient. This is Human Nature.

    We are whom we are and the sooner we adapt to this reality, the less we will complain and emphasize our strengths.

    The Mantra of New Hampshire is: “Live Free Or Die.” The Mantra of Nathan is: “Until God Calls Me.”

  9. Richard Demarest

    Really? I always heard that it was 10 percent at the low end and 20 percent at the high end.
    These numbers here seem incredibly low. I understand that this 3-4 percent is only those who identify as LGBTQ, but there are 3-5 times that number who remain “silent” and/or “closeted” for whatever reason. This is the same with the Hispanic or American Indian population. Stigma, discrimination, and harassment all serve to understate these populations, as well as the threat of deportation in the case of Latinos and Mexicans. Who really knows the answer? And will we ever have a truly accurate total of any of these populations?

  10. Marco

    Nobody can really tell the exact number of LGBT people , because there are those who are still not 100% with themselves even though it is 2019 and there are big progress in USA when it comes to LGBT rights. Also Iam surprised about the employment study , because past studies shown the opposite , that LGBT people usually are more educated and more LGBT usually have higher income


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